The OPIOID CRISIS … a mother’s loss

A Sagamok-Anishnawbek First Nation family has announced a reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the individual that sold a family member heroin, which led to her death.

Charlene Ann Owl’s daughter, Charrise, died in November from an overdose.

She was 28.

Charlene says the family announced the $2,000 reward at a rally against opioid addiction on Saturday.

Owl says the local police has not been in touch with her since her daughter’s passing, which led to her offering the reward. She says someone knows something out there and can help her with closure.

Her daughter had her struggles, but Charlene says she never gave up on her.

“She had four children who lost a mother. Her life was hard as she struggled with her addiction. The children are all split up now since her death. It is hard on them.”

Owl says opioid addiction needs a face and she is willing to be that face. She wants people to know that the epidemic affects families, friends and the wider community.
Charlene adds a local officer told her at the rally on Saturday that police are continuing the investigation and will provide her an update.

“I never had a conversation with anyone from our local police after her death or the 100 or so days since she died. I did not even know there was an investigation underway. People must talk about this. Someone has to answer for it. I am just seeking justice for my daughter and I need that closure.”

Charlene adds she is looking forward to placing the tombstone marking her daughter’s grave on April 16th, her birthday (if the ground is no longer frozen.)

In Espanola, Amber Rose also honoured the day in memory of Travis Piche who died from an overdose in February.

She put together a bouquet of black balloons on public display, which has become the symbol of opioid death, to honour his passing.

Piche was 41.

 

PHOTOS:

1. In Espanola, Amber Rose honoured the Opioid Awareness Day in memory of Travis Piche who died from an overdose in February. She put together a bouquet of black balloons on public display, which has become the symbol of opioid death.

  1. Charisse Owl died from a heroin overdose in November. Her mother says three recent overdose deaths in Sagamok-Anishnawbek First Nation are three too many. She wants police and community members to take a more proactive approach in standing behind the families and loved ones of those who have died, especially in solving their deaths.
  2. A cash reward of $2,000 is now being offered by the Owl family in memory of Charisse.
  3. Charlene Ann Owl says this tombstone will mark her daughter’s final resting place in April.

Photos provided by Owl family and Amber Rose

  1. Charlise, the daughter of the late Charisse Sterling of Sagamok now resides with family. She, family members and supporters attended the Fourth Opioid Trafficking Awareness Rally held on Saturday to announce a $2,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of the individual who sold heroin to her mother. Anyone with information is asked to call OPP at 1-888-310-1122 or message Charlene Ann (Owl) on Facebook.

    

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